Summary of shooting an elephant

There was a bit of tension between the locals and the foreign law enforcement since the British had taken over the country, so Orwell was not thought fondly of. The climax of this essay was when a otherwise tame elephant starts rampaging because is had gone into "must" a term used on page that means in heat.

Summary of shooting an elephant

Metaphors and Analysis You are here: He claims that it is evil and he is fully against the oppressors, the British. In the essay he writes not just about his personal experience with the elephant but how metaphorical the experience is to Imperialism and his views on the matter.

About the Author:

He already has established the fact that his character is weak when he introduces the Burma people and how they laugh and mock him, the British officer. The build-up of finding the elephant is a metaphor itself showing the destructive power of imperialism: Against his will and moral belief he decides to kill the elephant.

Orwell uses the death of the elephant as another metaphor of British Imperialism in Burma. On a side-note, Burma was a free kingdom until British expansion came in.

Summary of shooting an elephant

There were three wars between the British oppressors and the Burmese. There was the first Anglo-Burmese War inand then the second in That was the shot that did it for him.

Finally staying down after the third shot the elephant still lives, just as the Burmese people are still there but with less strength and hope after the wars.

Summary of "Shooting an Elephant" - English Notes by Patrice Jordan

They are now controlled by the British. But still he knows the truth to be false. The elephant could have been saved without unnecessary harm but Orwell chose the latter.

Orwell uses other metaphors such as when he compares himself to being a magician about to perform a trick, or as being a lead actor in a piece, and even an absurd puppet, a posing dummy, and to be wearing a mask. Even being a white man, the authority, it was even more expected.

It is then Orwell claims he realizes the true position of whites in the East and how Imperialism hurts not only the victims but the oppressors. Orwell explains how when the white man turns tyrant it is their own freedom they destroy.

Being the white man, Orwell says, they constantly must impress the natives and do what the natives expect of them.

The natives have the control of the white man.

Summary of shooting an elephant

Thus Orwell must complete his role, what is expected of him, and do definite things.The narrator (Orwell?) begins "Shooting an Elephant" by showing how much prejudice can be found in British Burma. In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only.

Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant” Essay Example | Graduateway

The main themes which are explored in “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell are imperialism and the conflicting conscience (enhanced by the motifs of shame and regret).

Imperialism By imperialism, we understand the extension of a country/empire’s power and authority over rutadeltambor.com://rutadeltambor.com  · Story summary: This is the second and final part of a short story written by Eric Blair (more commonly known as George Orwell) about an experience he had while being a police inspector in the British colonial service in Burma during the rutadeltambor.com /articles/shooting-an-elephant-parthtml.

“Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell works as the sub-divisional police officer of a town in the British colony of Burma. Because he is a military occupier, he is hated by much of the village. · "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped.

The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on rutadeltambor.com://rutadeltambor.com?id= Shooting an Elephant Questions and Answers.

The Question and Answer section for Shooting an Elephant is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

Rhetorical Analysis of Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" | Essay Example